Virtual Museum
Questions/Comments: Email Dr. Chris Troiano

Eb Valved Bugle by John F. Stratton, New York (1860's)

Eb Soprano Valved Bugle
 

This Eb cornet was made by John F. Stratton (New York) in the 1860's and came with the original mouthpiece, original case, and an original band book with handwritten music dated to have been copied between 1869-1870. It features top action rotary valves (TARV) and an adjustable leadpipe for tuning. The bore and taper throughout the horn makes this instrument similar to a flugel horn and can be more accurately described as a valved bugle.

This instrument was funded by donations made to the Green Machine Ensembles.

This instrument is owned by the Green Machine Ensembles at George Mason University.

Eb Over-the-Shoulder (OTS) Cornet by John F. Stratton, New York (reassembled mid-1800's)

OTS Eb Soprano
 

This Bb Over-the-Shoulder (OTS) cornet was assembled by contemporary brass repair technician Tim Holmes using two different instruments made by John F. Stratton (New York) in the mid-1800's. OTS brass instruments were invented and patented by Alan Dodworth in 1838 and quickly became the dominate brass instrument design for American military bands. The bands would oftentimes march in front of soldiers while marching, so the backwards bell made the music audible for the soldiers behind them. The instrument has a place for a lyre and features a prominent 'S' brace. The instrument came with a reproduction coffin case.

This instrument was funded by Brian Drummond and the Rea Charitable Trust. 

This instrument is owned by the Green Machine Ensembles at George Mason University.

Bb Over-the-Shoulder (OTS) Cornet by Tim Holmes (2000's)

Bb OTS Cornet
Bb OTS Cornet
Bb OTS Cornet
 

This Bb Over-the-Shoulder (OTS) cornet was built by contemporary brass repair technician Tim Holmes in the early 2000's. It features pinched-rotary valves and a removable bell to convert into a circular cornet, though we do not currently own a circular bell for this instrument. OTS brass instruments were invented and patented by Alan Dodworth in 1838 and quickly became the dominate brass instrument design for American military bands. The bands would oftentimes march in front of soldiers while marching, so the backwards bell made the music audible for the soldiers behind them.

This instrument was funded by the Rea Charitable Trust.

This instrument is owned by the Green Machine Ensembles at George Mason University.

Bb Cornopean, unmarked Paris (c. 1850's)

 
Bb Cornopean
Bb Cornopean
Bb Cornopean
Bb Cornopean
Bb Cornopean

With the invention of the Stölzel valve in 1814 by Heinrich Stölzel, brass instruments could now become more easily fully chromatic. Prior to the Stölzel valve, brass instruments could play chromatically by either the use of keys (keyed bugle & ophicleide) or a slide (trombone). The first instruments in the "trumpet family" to adopt the Stölzel valve were called cornopeans and were early designs for what would become cornets. This Bb cornopean is stamped "A. Paris" and features the Stölzel valve mechanism. Notice how there is tubing extending from the bottom of each valve casing, an unusual sight for those of us more familiar with modern cornets and trumpets. This instrument came with its original mouthpiece (not pictured), original lyre, and original Bb/A tuning crooks.

This instrument was funded by donations made to the Green Machine Ensembles.

This instrument is owned by the Green Machine Ensembles at George Mason University.

Bb Side Action Rotary Valve (SARV) Cornet by Lehnert, (c. 1867-1872)

Bb SARV Cornet
Bb SARV Cornet
 

This instrument was made by Henry Lehnert and is stamped Philadelphia, which places the instrument manufactoring date as c. 1867-1872. It features a side action rotary valve (SARV) design which was popular in the 19th-century and is still popular in Europe today. The instrument is bell-front facing and would be held on its side as opposed to vertically.

This instrument was funded by Samuel Laudenslager Jr.

This instrument is owned by the Green Machine Ensembles at George Mason University.

Eb Over-the-Shoulder (OTS) Alto Horn by John F. Stratton, New York (1860's)

 
Eb OTS Alto
Eb OTS Alto
Eb OTS Alto

This Eb Over-the-Shoulder (OTS) alto horn was made by John F. Stratton (New York) in the 1860's. John F. Stratton's 200 employees built 100 instruments per day during the American Civil War (1861-1865). This Eb OTS alto horn features the branded John F. Stratton shield on the bell and was likely built sometime during the 1860's. OTS brass instruments were invented and patented by Alan Dodworth in 1838 and quickly became the dominate brass instrument design for American military bands. The bands would oftentimes march in front of soldiers while marching, so the backwards bell made the music audible for the soldiers behind them.

This instrument was funded by the Rea Charitable Trust.

This instrument is owned by the Green Machine Ensembles at George Mason University.

Bb Tenor Horn by Boston Musical Instrument Manufactory, Boston (c. 1869/1870's)

 
BMI Bb Tenor
BMI Bb Tenor

The Boston Musical Instrument Manufactory (BMI) was formed in 1869 by E.G. Wright and Samuel Graves, two of the most highly-respected brass instrument manufacturers of their time. Many of the BMI instruments, especially in the early years of the company, used the instrument builds previously designed by E.G. Wright. This Bb tenor has a small bore and cylindrical taper which gives it a characteristic sound similar to that of a trombone. It features side action rotary valves (SARV) and was likely built in the early years of the BMI business.

This instrument was funded by the American Battlefield Trust.

This instrument is owned by the Green Machine Ensembles at George Mason University.

Bb Over-the-Shoulder (OTS) Baritone sold by R. Wurtilzer, Cincinnati (c. 1857-1871)

 
OTS Bb Baritone
OTS Bb Baritone
OTS Bb Baritone

The Wurlitzer family began making musical instruments in Cincinnati, Ohio in 1853. This Bb Over-the-Shoulder (OTS) Baritone is stamped "R. Wurlitzer" which dates the instrument between 1857-1871. During this period, most of the brass instruments sold by the Wurlitzer's were European imports. The instrument features silver bell garland and top action rotary valves (TARV). The instrument was restored in 1994 by Tim Holmes. OTS brass instruments were invented and patented by Alan Dodworth in 1838 and quickly became the dominate brass instrument design for American military bands. The bands would oftentimes march in front of soldiers while marching, so the backwards bell made the music audible for the soldiers behind them.

This instrument was funded by the Rea Charitable Trust.

This instrument is owned by the Green Machine Ensembles at George Mason University.

Bb Bass by E.G. Wright, Boston (c. 1864)

 
Screen Shot 2022-06-28 at 1.21.01 PM
118485431_10158585445774894_6543074603562676795_n
273216864_10159719521419894_5920800367375882697_n

This upright Bb bass was made by E.G. Wright around 1864 and is owned by Dr. Chris Troiano. The instrument features an upright bell, side action rotary valves (SARV), and came with its original case. The mouthpiece used on this instrument was made by the Boston Musical Instrument Manufactory, E.G. Wright's company that was formed in the late 1860's. Though referred to as a Bb bass, this instrument most similarly resembles a euphonium today. Tenor horns, baritone horns, and Bb basses all played in the same octave, but their tubing taper and bore diameters differed, thus giving them different sounds. The Bb bass would typically double the Eb bass part up 1 octave.

This instrument is owned by Dr. Chris Troiano and is used in the 8th Green Machine Regiment Band.

Bb Ophicleide by Guichard, Paris (c. 1827-1845)

 
Screen Shot 2022-06-28 at 3.32.19 PM

This Bb Ophicleide was made by A.G. Guichard in Paris between 1827-1845 and is owned by Dr. Chris Troiano. Guichard later went into business with his brother-in-law, P.L. Gautrot. Gautrot was a prominent musical instrument innovator in Paris and was in business as proprietor from 1845-1885. Gautrot was a frequent litigator against Adolphe Sax, though never successful in court.

The ophicleide is a keyed brass instrument that was invented in 1817 and patented in 1821 by French instrument maker Jean Hilaire Asté. It was a descendent of the serpent and a predecessor to the modern tuba and baritone/euphonium.

This instrument is owned by Dr. Chris Troiano and is used in the 8th Green Machine Regiment Band.

Eb Over-the-Shoulder (OTS) Bass, unmarked European import (1850's)

 
Eb OTS Bass
Eb OTS Bass
Eb OTS Bass

This is our Eb Over-the-Shoulder (OTS) bass. The lowest voice in most brass bands of the 19th-century, this instrument is pitched in between a modern euphonium and a modern BBb or CC tuba. Lower BBb and EEEb tubas were made in the 19th-century, but they are very uncommon. This Eb bass is unmarked, but is likely a European import from the 1850's. OTS brass instruments were invented and patented by Alan Dodworth in 1838 and quickly became the dominate brass instrument design for American military bands. The bands would oftentimes march in front of soldiers while marching, so the backwards bell made the music audible for the soldiers behind them.

This instrument was funded by the Rea Charitable Trust, the Bull Run Civil War Round Table, and Samuel Laudenslager Jr.

This instrument is owned by the Green Machine Ensembles at George Mason University.

Cooperman Rope-Tension Field Drums (c. 2016)

 
60345449_1508097672656359_2699230935143940096_n
13173625_520712344780887_5418056901154284006_n
60173066_1508097712656355_9120246431809011712_n

In 2016, the Patriots Fife and Drum Corps and Green Machine Ensembles were the recipients of 4 rope-tension field drums and 2 rope-tension bass drums. These instruments were made by Cooperman Fife and Drums in Vermont c. 2016 and hand-painted by Brooke Stevens of Loyal Drums c. 2019. The drums measure 17x17 and are common representations of field music drums from the 18th and 19th centuries. By sliding the leather drum ears down, the tension on the drum heads is increased giving it its characteristic sound. The artwork on the drums by Brooke Stevens depicts the University Seal for George Mason University.

These instruments were funded by Bob Devine for use by the Patriots Fife and Drum Corps.

These instruments are owned by the Green Machine Ensembles at George Mason University.

Drum Major Mace (c. 1800's)

IMG_4005
image0
Screen Shot 2022-06-28 at 3.35.14 PM
 

During the 19th-century, drum majors were often the leaders of the field music unit. They would leads the fife and drum corps as well as the bands during parades and reviews. This 19th-century drum major mace was restored by Mike Warnick and features a red mace cord.

This mace is owned by Dr. Chris Troiano and is used by the 8th Green Machine Regiment Band.